Block House 250

Block House 250

Photo Credit – Roy Engelbrecht

Step back into time and imagine how Pittsburgh and its surrounding areas were 250 years ago.  The French and Indian War was finally over, and Fort Pitt, one of the largest British forts in North America, had just survived a months-long siege by the Native American Indians during Pontiac’s War.  Colonel Henry Bouquet, commander of the fort, decided that something had to be done in order to strengthen the defense of Fort Pitt.  He ordered his men to construct defensive redoubts around the perimeter of the fort, with most of these being completed in 1764.  One of these redoubts was the building we now call the Fort Pitt Block House.

An early 20th century postcard image of the Block House following its restoration in 1894.

An early 20th century postcard image of the Block House following its restoration in 1894.

Now, 250 years later, the Block House still stands at its original location in the Point.  The only remaining structure left of Fort Pitt, the Block House has served as a witness to Pittsburgh history and its changes for over two centuries.  This year, 2014, marks the anniversary of this historic building, and celebrations have already taken place to honor one of Pittsburgh’s greatest treasures.

 

Fort Pitt Society President, Elizabeth Wheatley, cuts the ribbon to formally open the Edith Ammon Memorial Garden on April 24, 2014.  Photo credit: Fort Pitt Society

Fort Pitt Society President, Elizabeth Wheatley, cuts the ribbon to formally open the Edith Ammon Memorial Garden on April 24, 2014. Photo credit: Fort Pitt Society

The first major event for Block House 250 was the dedication of the new Edith Ammon Memorial Garden on April 24, 2014. Located on the grounds of the Block House, the garden serves as a tribute to the members of the Fort Pitt Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution who were responsible for saving the building from destruction by the Pennsylvania Railroad in the early 20th century. The great-grandson of one these remarkable women held a book signing at the Block House on July 17, 2014, in recognition of its 250th anniversary. James Oliver Goldsborough, descendent of Amelia Neville Shields Oliver, signed copies of two of his books, The Paris Herald and Misfortunes of Wealth, the latter being a memoir of his maternal ancestry, the Oliver family of Pittsburgh. A portion of proceeds from all the book sales went toward the preservation and operation of the Block House.

Summer Celebration PosterBlock House 250 Outdoor Celebration. On August 9th, members of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the entire Pittsburgh community came together to celebrate the 250th anniversary at Point State Park. Re-enactors and living history demonstrations helped to bring history alive for visitors to the Block House. Local officials and performers added to the festivities. Sponsored by Pennsylvania Department of Conservation & Natural Resources, Senator John Heinz History Center and the Pittsburgh Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution the event was free to the public and guests wishing to visit the exhibits at the Fort Pitt Museum were able to do so with a reduced ticket price of only $2.50. For pictures of the event see the Fort Pitt Block House Facebook page.

Julie Nixon Eisenhower will speak at the Block House 250 Gala on September 11, 2014.

Julie Nixon Eisenhower will speak at the Block House 250 Gala on September 11, 2014.

Block House 250 Gala. The capstone of our yearlong commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the building of the Fort Pitt Block House will be the Block House 250 gala celebration to be held on September 11, 2014, at the Wyndham Grand Hotel – Downtown Pittsburgh. A highlight of the September gala’s festivities will be a keynote address by bestselling author, editor, and speaker, Julie Nixon Eisenhower. Julie, the daughter of 37th US President Richard Nixon, is the author of three books and has lectured for more than 25 years on such subjects as the presidency, women in politics and life in the White House. As a lifelong volunteer, Julie’s efforts during the Nixon administration on behalf of children, the elderly, and the environment led her to be voted one of the Ten Most Admired Women in America by Good Housekeeping readers on four occasions.

Julie’s presentation at the September 11th event will focus on “The Power of History:  Why We Remember and the Legacy of the Fort Pitt Block House.”  Tickets are still available for this historic event and can now be purchased online.

Joining the Fort Pitt Society in its gala Block House 250 celebration is an Honorary Committee made up of community leaders and dignitaries including: Betty Arenth, Senator John Heinz History Center; William Callahan, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission; Jon Delano, KDKA-TV; Senator Jim Ferlo, Pennsylvania State Senate; Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald; James Oliver Goldsborough, descendant of Amelia Neville Shields Oliver; Mathew D. Greene, Park Manager, Point State Park; Alan Gutchess, Fort Pitt Museum; Paul F. Kennedy and Nancy Kennedy, descendants of State Representative Michael H. Kennedy; James P. McDonald, BNY Mellon; J. Kevin McMahon, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust;  Bobbi McMullen, PSSDAR State Regent; Virgina Stewart Nicklas, community volunteer; Betsy Lynn Teti, DAR; and Arthur P. Ziegler, Jr., Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation.

James Oliver Goldsborough signs copies of his books at the book signing on July 17th.  Photo credit: Fort Pitt Society

James Oliver Goldsborough signs copies of his books at the book signing on July 17th. Photo credit: Fort Pitt Society

The final event in the Block House 250 celebrations will be the dedication of a time capsule at the Senator John Heinz History Center in November 2014.

Updates on all Block House 250 activities and events will be posted here on the Block House website as well as on our Facebook page.

 

Block House 250 Coins

Front face of Block House 250 coin.

Front face of Block House 250 coin.

In honor of the 250th anniversary of the Block House, commemorative brass coins have been produced and are available for purchase.  The coins, pictured left and right, are made of brass and measure 1.5″ in diameter.

Back face of Block House 250 coin.

Back face of Block House 250 coin.

These commemorative coins will be available for a limited time, and they can only be purchased through the Fort Pitt Block House.  Retail price is $20.00 each.  For more information on purchasing these and other Block House souvenirs, contact (412) 471-1764 or email us through the Contact Us page on this website. Information on ways to give to the Fort Pitt Block House is available by clicking here.

 

 

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